Philly

Posts Tagged ‘gov’t assistance’

Workers’ Comp Issues for an Injured Adjunct

In Philly Blog on June 25, 2014 at 1:00 am

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Linda Lee, and adjunct from the Philadelphia region, wrote this article which was published in The Chronicle of Higher Ed’s Adjunct Project. After injuring herself on campus grounds, she learned that being an adjunct had repercussions for her treatment, and she shares the important lessons she learned.  

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Hunger Strike

In Philly Blog on June 25, 2014 at 1:00 am

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post by Wende Marshall

I was recently invited to participate on an Anthropology Association of America panel about food and identity. I was slow in responding, and as I pondered the invitation over several days I realized that the idea of the panel was deeply disturbing to me. I realized that my experience as an adjunct struggling to survive without a full time permanent job had significantly altered the way that I think about the academy and about academic research and writing. There was a time when I might have jumped at the chance to be on the panel, when I would have been honored to have been asked to join colleagues working on issues similar to mine. But as I considered the invitation what I felt was a chilling sense of how inadequate the academic response has been to the crumbling structures of higher education and to the growing wealth and income gap. Read the rest of this entry »

The Adjunct Tightrope

In Philly Blog on June 19, 2014 at 1:00 am

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by Michelle Martin

In Spring 2013, after 8 years of grad school, getting married and having twin daughters in the process, I finally finished my doctorate in English.  Along the way I taught freshman composition numerous times, business writing, intro to the short story, intro to fiction, Contemporary American Fiction, even History of the English Language, for which I wasn’t well-qualified but I gamely took on anyway because – as you might have guessed – I needed the money.  The latter class I taught in Fall 2013, the semester after I finished grad school when I began my adjunct career.  Prior to this, I had taught in the capacity of graduate teaching assistant. While that situation possesses its own set of exploitative complexities, since it is technically not contingent labor, I’ll begin my account with the Fall ’13 semester.  Read the rest of this entry »