Philly

Archive for June, 2014|Monthly archive page

Workers’ Comp Issues for an Injured Adjunct

In Philly Blog on June 25, 2014 at 1:00 am

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Linda Lee, and adjunct from the Philadelphia region, wrote this article which was published in The Chronicle of Higher Ed’s Adjunct Project. After injuring herself on campus grounds, she learned that being an adjunct had repercussions for her treatment, and she shares the important lessons she learned.  

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Hunger Strike

In Philly Blog on June 25, 2014 at 1:00 am

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post by Wende Marshall

I was recently invited to participate on an Anthropology Association of America panel about food and identity. I was slow in responding, and as I pondered the invitation over several days I realized that the idea of the panel was deeply disturbing to me. I realized that my experience as an adjunct struggling to survive without a full time permanent job had significantly altered the way that I think about the academy and about academic research and writing. There was a time when I might have jumped at the chance to be on the panel, when I would have been honored to have been asked to join colleagues working on issues similar to mine. But as I considered the invitation what I felt was a chilling sense of how inadequate the academic response has been to the crumbling structures of higher education and to the growing wealth and income gap. Read the rest of this entry »

UAP at the White House Working Families Summit

In News, Philly Blog on June 24, 2014 at 1:00 am

Anna and Ruthie

 

Yesterday the White House held an all-day summit focusing on labor issues with an impact on families. Anna Neighbor, a Philadelphia adjunct and member of the United Academics of Philadelphia, was invited to attend to represent adjunct moms.

Here’s a link to the AFL-CIO’s page which introduces the many union moms who attended.

Compensation in Higher Ed

In Hub Features, News, Philly Blog on June 23, 2014 at 1:00 am

Comix by Bugsy

 

Below are a number of sources for information regarding the salaries of faculty and administrators in higher ed:

The Administrators in Higher Education Salary Survey conducted by The College and University Professional Association for Human Resources (CUPA-HR).

According to the site, “Findings reflect the salaries of 54,853 job incumbents in public and private institutions nationwide. Salaries were reported by 1,247 institutions for 191 selected positions, mostly at the director level and above.” They report a range from a median salary of $42,400 for a Campus Greek Life Administrator to $539,537 for Chief Health Affairs Officer.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Adjunct Tightrope

In Philly Blog on June 19, 2014 at 1:00 am

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by Michelle Martin

In Spring 2013, after 8 years of grad school, getting married and having twin daughters in the process, I finally finished my doctorate in English.  Along the way I taught freshman composition numerous times, business writing, intro to the short story, intro to fiction, Contemporary American Fiction, even History of the English Language, for which I wasn’t well-qualified but I gamely took on anyway because – as you might have guessed – I needed the money.  The latter class I taught in Fall 2013, the semester after I finished grad school when I began my adjunct career.  Prior to this, I had taught in the capacity of graduate teaching assistant. While that situation possesses its own set of exploitative complexities, since it is technically not contingent labor, I’ll begin my account with the Fall ’13 semester.  Read the rest of this entry »

Meet a Member

In Philly Blog on June 18, 2014 at 1:00 am

Jay Muhlin talks with Anna Neighbor

Jay Muhlin

When did you become a UAP member and why?

I became a member in April 2014 after my first union meeting because the issues facing adjunct workers effect so many people. I want to work towards fair labor practices that benefit teachers, students, and the higher educational system at large.

When not juggling day jobs, where are we most likely to find you?

Around art in one way or another. I am an artist member of Vox Populi artist collective, so I might be gallery sitting, planning out an exhibit, pouring beer at an opening, painting a wall white, working in my studio, making photographs, or with my family.

If you had a personal mascot what would it be?

Read the rest of this entry »

The High Cost of Higher Ed

In News on June 10, 2014 at 9:18 pm

Salon has published an article by Thomas Frank recounting just about every justification that administrations have used to explain the escalation of college costs. He states that tuition has increased 1200% since the 1980’s:

“Tuition has increased at a rate double that of medical care, usually considered the most expensive of human necessities. It has outstripped any reasonable expectation people might have had for investments over the period.” 

He questions the fingers that point to the cost of regulations, teachers and student needs.

“Nobody knows why tuition increases lagged behind consumer prices in the 1970s and jumped ahead in the 1980s,” according to an Associated Press summary. But in retrospect I think the answer is obvious. It happened then because these things are all related: deregulation, tax cuts, de-unionization and outrageous tuition inflation are all part of the same historical turn.”

It’s an article well worth reading.

What Can I Do? How Full Time Faculty can Help Adjuncts

In Philly Blog on June 10, 2014 at 12:56 pm

help wanted

 

Post by Jennie Shanker

Summer is here! Our three-month span off campus is called a vacation, and indeed many faculty members are able to travel, have time to focus on their scholarly work, and enjoy great freedom in their schedule. It’s important for teachers to have a break from the responsibilities and demands that accompany each school term. Without it, the research and creative endeavors of the faculty are diminished, ultimately affecting what they have to offer the institution and their students.

Certainly for those of us who teach on a part-time basis, there is no summer vacation. Read the rest of this entry »

Rate-My-Professor

In Hub Features on June 9, 2014 at 12:10 pm

Philadelphia area adjuncts read Rate-My-Professor entries from their students in this video from the United Academics of Philadelphia. For many adjuncts, this is the only source of feedback they receive about their teaching. The video was premiered on April 19th at the UAP Adjunct Symposium

 

whatever doesnt kill me